New Law Would Make Harmful, Repeat Traffic Violations, a Felony Charge

The Florida Senate is currently considering a bill that would take a significantly tougher stance on drivers who have caused serious injury to others—even if they, technically, haven't committed a crime. The bill, SB 1254, would make a second, noncriminal traffic infraction that caused serious bodily harm punishable as a third degree felony.

The bill, introduced by State Senator Bean, has not yet passed, but is making its way through the state legislature this session. If passed and signed, the new law would become effective July 1, 2015.

For a theoretical offender to be punished under this law, they would need to have caused two road accidents that resulted in a serious bodily injury or death within a five year period. The bill defines serious bodily injury in this case as "a physical condition that creates a substantial risk of death, serious personal disfigurement, or protracted loss or impairment of the function of any bodily member or organ."

SB 1254 would significantly alter the legal landscape and make a new, significant number of Florida drivers vulnerable to criminal penalty in the years to come. Our firm will continue to monitor SB 1254's status in the Florida Senate and, if it passes, prepare to assess the effect it could have on future clients and our community.

If you or a loved one is facing a criminal charge, then we invite you to contact us at Herman Law, P.A. today. Our team is experienced in both state and federal law and has successfully navigated over 150 jury trials. Over that time, Attorney Ron D. Herman has built a reputation of providing aggressive, knowledgeable, and results-driven counsel.

Trust your case to a West Palm Beach criminal defense lawyer you can rely on. Contact us today for a free consultation.

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